Visual Representation

Visual Representation

If you don’t push the boundaries, you wont go anywhere…

In the wake of the controversy surrounding Dolce & Gabbana's use of Blackamoor imagery in their Spring 2013 collection, the fashion house has issued an explanation on its website Swide.com. The post says that the heads used in their designs are based on "Moorish" figures-- "a term used to define many peoples throughout history...In Sicily’s case it defines the conquerors of Sicily." It goes on to explain more of Sicily's specific cultural history behind the figures, including their role in inspiring "beautiful artifacts (vases, lamps, etc). However, as we state in the article below, the images are also seen as taboo, offensive and racially insensitive. The Mammy-looking figures recall a past of slavery and servitude that many don't want to be reminded of--especially via a fashion statement.

In the wake of the controversy surrounding Dolce & Gabbana’s use of Blackamoor imagery in their Spring 2013 collection, the fashion house has issued an explanation on its website Swide.com. The post says that the heads used in their designs are based on “Moorish” figures– “a term used to define many peoples throughout history…In Sicily’s case it defines the conquerors of Sicily.” It goes on to explain more of Sicily’s specific cultural history behind the figures, including their role in inspiring “beautiful artifacts (vases, lamps, etc). However, as we state in the article below, the images are also seen as taboo, offensive and racially insensitive. The Mammy-looking figures recall a past of slavery and servitude that many don’t want to be reminded of–especially via a fashion statement.

Dolce & Gabbana caused massive discussion in media because they dressed white girl in dress that represents black women and wearing earrings from “black” people culture.

There are more then two ways of how to take the advert. Other countries veiw racism and culture differnetly than American’s so we should give them a pass. Curious though that they want to celebrate a culture but have no one from that culture representing – so would there be any difference if the women wearing this outfit would come from different race?

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We need to be able to laugh at our selves. But we have to be able to put our selves in their shoes. We live in world of Political correctness and there is no surprise that advertiser might get sacked. There will be people who will like the outfit and then there will be people who will find it offensive.

The world of Advertising depends on stereotypes.

People are not products. They have unique traits, emotions and capabilities. Instead of advertising to these needs, marketers tend to illustrate all the things an individual “should be.”

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It seems like recent advertisements have become bolder than ever in their use of gender stereotypes and sexism to try to sell a product.

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Julia Roberts – A campaign she did for the brand last year was banned by the Advertising Standards Authority, who deemed L’Oreal, parent company of Lancome, had used digitally retouched images that could ‘mislead’ the viewer.

L’Oreal said at the time that image had been digitally re-touched to ‘lighten the skin, clean up make-up, reduce dark shadows and shading around the eyes, smooth the lips and darken the eyebrows’. However, again, it insisted that the image was an accurate reflection of the benefits of the product.

The ASA was not convinced, ruling the images could not be used again in their current form.

Here though, it cannot be denied that Julia Roberts is in possession of a striking natural beauty.

Edward Ackerley, an instructor at the Eller College of Management department of marketing, said that advertising is reflective of the current mindset of society.

“It’s simply like holding up a mirror,” Ackerley said. “Advertising will only go so far as society has gone.” 

 I feel that advertising goes feather each year, as they have achieved something new they wont stop till they release something more extravagant and push the boundaries.

The need of being interesting in the market is understandable, but when it comes to advertisers picking out girls who look much younger then they are it will cause contribution and consequences – angry parents and confused children

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Victoria's Secret Sells to High School Girls. So What?

Victoria’s Secret Sells to High School Girls. So What?

Victoria’s Secret recently launched a new advertising campaign with the slogan “Bright Young Things” for their popular Pink line, which is aimed at younger women. It probably would have gone unnoticed, except that Business Insider reported on the CFO of the company admitting that Victoria’s Secret wants to sell to high school girls as well as college girls.

“When somebody’s 15 or 16 years old, what do they want to be?” Chief Financial Officer Stuart Burgdoerfer said at a conference. “They want to be older, and they want to be cool like the girl in college, and that’s part of the magic of what we do at Pink.”

This simple and frankly obvious comment was all people needed to go off into a self-righteous huff about how The Sex would be the ruin of a generation of girls. Angry father Evan Dolive wrote a letter to Victoria’s Secret that went viral:

I want my daughter (and every girl) to be faced with tough decisions in her formative years of adolescence. Decisions like should I be a doctor or a lawyer? Should I take calculus as a junior or a senior? Do I want to go to Texas A&M or University of Texas or some Ivy League School? Should I raise awareness for slave trafficking or lack of water in developing nations? There are many, many more questions that all young women should be asking themselves… not will a boy (or girl) like me if I wear a “call me” thong?

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They are right by one thing – young girls want to be older and more fashionable, like their older sister or someone they have seen in TV, but should we persuade them to grow up early, and saying that, will those girls take the responsibility as grownups or just pretend to be ones.

Why don’t we just let them be what they are – kids, children who shouldn’t rush into adulthood.

 

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